Deep Throat Does The (Toronto) Environment

I recently found myself sifting through back issues of the University of Toronto's Varsity in an on-going effort to understand the campus community’s burgeoning environmental consciousness. Along the way I’ve come across an assortment of articles showcasing the best in student journalism. Lawrence Clarke's "Can Linda Lovelace really be ‘just the girl next door?" (March 14, 1975, pages 16-17) is one such piece.

Lovelace, who rocketed to infamy with her starring "performance" in the 1972 adult film Deep Throat, was in Toronto the Good to promote her forthcoming feature Linda Lovelace for President.

(I hear it had a clever plot.)

In between the occasionally awkward questioning ("What would you do if you met the head of the Roman Catholic Church?" did not spark the insightful response the interviewer apparently hoped for), Lovelace’s stinging critique of simulated sex in mainstream cinema (her thoughts on the racy Last Tango in Paris? "The sex was so obviously faked it was stupid."), and the obligatory defense of her line of work (shoot 'em up films, she argued, are the real pornography), it turns out Lovelace was deeply concerned with the state of Toronto’s environment.

Sitting in her room on the 29th floor of the Hyatt Regency hotel, Lovelace began critiquing the pollution outside. "Toronto’s air isn’t that much better than New York City or Chicago …. In five years children will be dying from this air, but no one cares." And, while she believed the air problems could be solved, she wasn’t optimistic that the present political structure would allow for the necessary changes. Predicting catastrophe, Lovelace announced her intention to go back to the land: "I'd like to buy a farm soon either in the U.S. or in Scandinavia. Then I'd like to learn how to farm just for survival, not to make money or anything. It's people who do this who are going to have a chance to go on living when something does go wrong."

I wonder if Traci Lords gave any interviews on acid rain?